Eaglecrest Ski Area

Juneau, Alaska
tel. 907-790-2000
www.skijuneau.com

CURRENT SNOW REPORT:

Updated:02-06-2016 09:20:14BaseTop
New Snow (24hrs)33
New Snow (48hrs)3.39
Total Snow10101
Temp32°F27°F
Wind506

Total Snow to Date: 194.3"

02-06-2016 09:20:14:Grooming crew reported 3 more inches earlier this morning, and its been snowing heavy since they called in. The snowline is well below the Eaglecrest parking lot. Top is 27 degrees with winds around 15 knots. Base is hovering right around 32. Check back later this morning and well get update our official snowfall measurement, but really just get up here. The skiing is the best it's been in a while. Weve gotten more than 16" in the past three days, and it is accumulated at the base.

Expect some great groomer skiing out East and on Most, Raven, and Log Jam on the West side. Off trail skiing is very high quality with all this new snow, lots of untracked powder. The forecast looks like more of the same ahead, so if you see rain at sea level, you better give us a look and see what its like up here.

For today Mountain Lift will be serving out of the Eagle's Nest. All chairlift are running. Lifts start at 9am. Hooter and porcupine will close at 4. Ptarmigan and Black Bear at 3:30. Bowls close at least 30 minutes before last chair. Cross country skiing is groomed for both skating and classic styles on the upper Nordic loop, access via the Trickster trail. Low snow conditions do exist on the lower mountain.

The whole month of February our Retail and Repair Shops will have great deals: $10 off full tunes, $5 off edge/wax combos, and T-Shirts for just $13!

Weather Underground PWS KAKJUNEA17 Mobile Friendly Stats Page

Snow Report and Weather

06 kts · 27°F · 24HR Snowfall 3"

CONDITIONS

Mountain Safety Eaglecrest

Your Responsibility Code

Skiing can be enjoyed in many ways. At ski areas you may see people using alpine, snowboard, telemark, cross country and other specialized ski equipment, such as that used by disabled or other skiers. Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers the responsibility for a great skiing experience.

Know the Code

  1. Stay in control.
  2. People ahead have the right of way.
  3. Stop in a safe place for you and others.
  4. When starting downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.
  5. Use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe signs and warnings, and keep off of closed trails.
  7. Know how to use the lifts safely.

Terrain Safety - Make a plan!

Everytime you use freestyle terrain, make a plan for each feature you want to use. Your speed, approach and take off will directly affect your manueauver and landing.

1.  Look before you leap.  Scope around the jumps first, not over them. Know your landings are clear and clear yourself out of the landing area.

2.  Easy style it. Start small and work your way up. Inverted aerials are NOT recommended.

3.  Respect gets respect. From the lift line throughout the mountain.

Responsible Chairlift Use

To safely use the chairlifts, always remember:

 

    • Need assistance? Ask the lift attendant for help. Smallest kids should load closest to the attendant.
    • Remove & carry packs. Do not use phones, music or games while loading or unloading.
    • It is OK to miss a chair and wait for the next one.
    • When loading, watch for approaching chair and then sit to the back once seated!
    • Drop something? Let it FALL. Any item dropped can be picked up later.
    • Absolutely NO horseplay on the lifts!!

Kids on Lifts   No Horseplay!

Risk of Avalanche

While snow safety and avalanche mitigation efforts help reduce the risk of avalanches, avalanches and snow slides may occur at ski areas, both inside and outside of the posted boundaries.  Avalanches are an inherent risk of the sport due to the nature of snow and it's accumulation on steep, mountainous terrain. Become educated on how to reduce the risk of injury or death from avalanches through your own actions and awareness.  Visit htt://www.avalanche.org or contact the Eaglecrest Ski Patrol for further information on the risks and prevention of avalanche-related injuries or death.

 

Deep Snow & Tree Well Safety

What is a Tree Well?

A tree well is a void or depression that forms around the base of a tree can and contain a mix of low hanging branches, loose snow and air. Evergreen trees in particular (fir, hemlock, etc) can have large, deep tree wells that form when low hanging branches block snow from filling in and consolidating around the base of the tree. These voids can be hidden from view by the tree’s low hanging branches.

There is no easy way to identify if a particular tree has a dangerous tree well by sight therefore, treat all tree wells as dangerous.

In simple terms, a tree well is a hole or void in the deep snow, which is clearly marked by a tree. You can easily identify and avoid these areas.

Tree Well DiagramTree Well Safety

Eaglecrest Ski Area also promotes the following safety programs on the hill:

Lids on Kids  National Safety Awareness Month Heads Up!   Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month 

For more detailed information please visit DeepSnowSafety.org

 

 

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